Clone again. Bitter American 4

I brewed this a while back, kicked the keg tonight while bottling for homebrewing club night. I said I’d share my notes / recipe. The Recipe is based on the BYO Clones from cans recipes. https://byo.com/stories/issue/itemlist/category/52-mar-apr-2012 (no recipe here). I’ve been making different versions of this beer since I started, this might be the best version so far.

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This versions brew day was interesting I made some successful audibles that helped keep the beer on track, but I still had one issue which I think prevented the beer from fully attenuating. I corrected a preboil gravity issue, by boiling to the correct preboil gravity / volume. I also made a last minute hop substitution. This was huge for me. Making the correct adjustments in time was confidence inspiring. I feel like if I can do this, I can really turn a corner in my brewing. The one issue was with underpitching my yeast, which lead to a very slow ferment with the us05, and likely the under attenuation. With the Keg kicked, it’s time to brew another hoppy Pale, to keep the hoppy beers fresh and coming. The question is, another Bitter American, or something new.

When I do brew this again, these are my thoughts. The aroma is good, the bitterness is a little over the top, so I’ll want to lower the bittering charge, and move the 15m to 10m. I don’t think it needs a double dry hop regime, I dry hopped in primary, and that was good enough for this beer. I would like it to dry out bit more, and go back to c40. I think next time, I’ll pitch the proper amount of yeast, but I will consider a move to s04 instead of us05.

http://beersmithrecipes.com/viewrecipe/713568/bitter-american-clone

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Bitter American Clone  American Pale Ale
Batch Size : 2.00 gal     68.5 IBUs Estimated.
OG: 1.0488 SG     FG: 1.020 SG
Mash: BIAB, Full Body
Boil: 90 minutes

Fermentables
Amt Name Type # %/IBU
1.50 kg Golden Promise (Simpsons) (2.00 SRM) Grain 4 84.3 %
0.10 kg Munich I (Weyermann) (7.10 SRM) Grain 5 5.6 %
0.08 kg Acidulated (Weyermann) (1.80 SRM) Grain 6 4.5 %
0.05 kg Caramel Malt – 20L (Briess) (20.00 SRM) Grain 7 2.8 %
0.05 kg Caramel Malt – 60L (Briess) (60.00 SRM) Grain 8 2.8 %
Hops Used
Amt Name Type # %/IBU
8.00 g Nugget [13.00 %] – Boil 60.0 min Hop 9 33.1 IBUs
14.00 g Centennial [10.00 %] – Boil 15.0 min Hop 10 22.1 IBUs
14.00 g Citra [13.40 %] – Steep/Whirlpool 15.0 min Hop 13 13.3 IBUs
14.00 g Centennial [10.00 %] – Dry Hop 7.0 Days Hop 15 0.0 IBUs
9.00 g Simcoe [13.00 %] – Dry Hop 7.0 Days Hop 16 0.0 IBUs
Yeasts Used
Amt Name Type # %/IBU
0.5 pkg Safale American (DCL/Fermentis #US-05) [50.28 ml] Yeast 14

 

 

Misc Ingredients
Amt Name Type # %/IBU
4.00 g Gypsum (Calcium Sulfate) (Mash 60.0 mins) Water Agent 2
2.00 g Calcium Chloride (Mash 60.0 mins) Water Agent 3
0.50 Items Whirlfloc Tablet (Boil 5.0 mins) Fining 11
2.00 tsp Yeast Energizer (Boil 5.0 mins) Other 12

 

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Imperial IPA II

After having a few of Mike’s latest hoppy beer, pliny light, I had to brew another imperial IPA. My first attempt was ok, but was pretty sweet, higher abv, and darker than it’s inspiration (heady topper). My goal is to get this one to dry out, have a lighter finish, less fruity, more dank, more grapefruit hop profile. When reworking this recipe, I referenced the same sources I hit up the first time. Continue reading

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Plan C, batch number three of the Daisy cutter clone.

The third batch of the Daisy cutter came hot on the heels of batch #2, brewed just one week later. One might think it’s boring brewing the same beer over again, but I’ve found it’s the opposite. The challenge of trying to get repeatability and predictability and improvement from my brewing system is thrilling. Brewing batch two showed me more things that I needed to work on with my process. These are the nuances that I’d otherwise not pick up by brewing a new recipe each time. I’m seeing parts of my process that have been close enough, but that doesn’t cut it when you are trying to hit the same numbers again. One that caught my attention in the second batch was volume measurements of strike, sparge, runoff, and pre and post boil. I’ve jumped around between different brewing vessels so much, that it’s hard to remember which measurement is what volume in a specific pot. Before brewing batch 3 I took some measurements so I knew how much volume my total run off should be, and what my post boil volume should also be. With these measurement and my gravity notes, I’ll be able to tell and tune my efficiency going forward. I feel like I’m slowly working out small process issues, as well as incrementally improve the recipe. Continue reading

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Taking a second chop at the daisy cutter.

A month after my first attempt at brewing a daisy cutter clone I brewed this recipe. My first brew session wasn’t the smoothest, but I did hit my numbers and volume, so it wasn’t all bad. The beer isn’t bad either but It’s a work in progress. I gave a few bottles to friends, and I’m looking forward to some constructive feedback. The aroma was nice, but not what I wanted. The color is good, but darker than the original. The residual sweetness is good, it seems clean, dry, but does not have nearly enough hop flavor. The aroma is also too candy like. With that in mind, along with my first batch missteps, I had some process changes and recipe changes in mind. Continue reading

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Daisy Cutter Clone Review

I was able to start trying this beer just 15 days after being brewed. It was in primary for 4 days, secondary on dry hop for 4 days, and now in the keg carbonating for 7. It’s possible this beer still has some time to come into its own. So far it’s a bit grassy. I like the hop aroma, but it is very candy like, it could be more piney or citrusy. The beer definitely has haze. Lacing is good. Color is where I’d like it. It’s really missing the hop flavor punch I was hoping to get by a high level of late hopping. It’s FG is also a lot higher than the commercial example.

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To dial it in these are some of the changes I’m considering, and my goals on making those changes. I have not decided exactly which changes I’m going to do yet. I want to avoid making too many changes. However the biggest priority is getting hop flavor into the beer.

Adjust the hopping. My first take on the recipe, I pushed all the non bittering hops to whirlpool,thinking I’d get great hop flavor with that. I was wrong. I think I’ll split the hops back out, and do a 10 and 0/whirlpool. Updated process will be to flame out, then add whirlpool hops, and chill until 190. Allow to rest / settle for 20 minutes, then chill to 60, whirlpool, run off.

I’m not too worried about the malt bill, but I’d like to dry it out a little more. I’m considering trying US-05, but with fresh repitchable 1968 around, I can’t see that happening. Despite the fact more attenuative us-05 would bring the beer closer to the measured fg of the original, 1.007.

Other changes to lower fg would be to alter the grain bill to go to all two row, or to drop the mash temperature to 148/150 for 90, for a much more fermentable wort.
All in all, the beer was good enough for me to kick the 2.5g keg in just under a month from the time it was transfered into it. The fastest I’ve turned over a keg since I’ve started kegging.
Daisy Cutter Clone Brewing Log
Recipe.
Clone discussion on home brew talk.

 

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Brewing Daisy Cutter pale ale Clone

It’s been a while since I’ve brewed at home and it feels longer since I’ve brewed a good beer. I’ve felt either rushed, distracted, or otherwise I screwed up my last few batches. Coincidence or not, I also haven’t brewed a really hoppy pale ale in some time. I won’t go into the details here, I’ve already shared one failure on Facebook. Lets just say I could really use a win. Early this year I decided I was going to try to dial in my brewing, calling it the year of calibration. I am trying to both harden my brewing process, and add process controls. That way I can know how specifically I brewed a beer, which will allow me to reproduce success, and improve upon the beer in future batches. I haven’t been terribly consistent with either process or equipment in my last few batches. I think I’ve made my last major changes for a while, and my hope is that I can take this beer, evaluate it, access the recipe and brewing process, then brew it again making only slight changes to the process.
Continue reading

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Homebrew Review – Heady Topper clone

Posting some belated tasting notes for the Heady Topper Clone which was brewed back in May. This beer was a bit of a challenge to brew, with the hop bill, and hopping regimen. I ran into some issues during the brew day, and after which resulted in the beer not being quite what I wanted. With that said, I’m eager to make another attempt at this beer.

When I brewed this there were three clear issues in the brewing process of this beer, I overshot my OG by a significant amount. I could have corrected this in the brew kettle, but in an oversight I did not. I allowed this to ferment too high. Despite my cool basement, and a water bath to chill this beer out, I was not able to keep it under control. When a beer with this much fermentables it’s easy for it to just run away, and ferment hot. I hope to be handle this by moving the sugar addition to the fermenter, and building a fermentation control chamber. Lastly, my final issue was that the yeast gave up the ghost. I hope to have a fresh built up pitch of conan for my next batch.

I’m happy with the resulting beer despite the issues. This is not a clone in any respect, the inclusion of crystal malt, my altered hop bill, and the beer is far too different from the original. It’s far too sweet, not pithy and grapefruity that I get with the real deal. It’s also has non of the peachy aroma that’s prominent from the can. The color is darker, and the body is also noticeably thicker.

On the plus side, the head retention is great. The aroma was really fruity, and hoppy. The beer was a really good DIPA, and I’m disappointed to say, I didn’t drink it nearly fast enough.

Overall for my first take on a double ipa, and such a overly hopped beer, I did ok.

Changes planned for the next time:

o2, I’ve now added this to my brewing setup.

2.5g or smaller batch. I don’t consume high abv beers fast, I’m ashamed to admit I’ve still got some on hand.

Reset my recipe, based on this thread: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f12/heady-topper-can-you-clone-390082/

Basically, Match the grain and hop bill more closely.

Water chemistry. This is something I’ve been putting off until I have a better grasp of my brewing process, but it’s important to all beer stlyes, but much more so for hoppy beers.

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Brewing Bitter New Englander for NHC’s club night.

I had to get this brewing session in as I was running out of time to brew my contribution to club night for the National Homebrewers Conference. While I won’t be there, I’m really excited to be sending this beer for my peers.This beer will be one of many being poured by my club members at the Brew Free or Die (BFD) booth, just look for the drinking old man of the mountain. This is my second try at this recipe. I brewed a Bitter American clone as my first all grain batch back in mid December. That first beer was all over the place, missed mash temps, stuck sparges, and extremely low volumes to and from kettle, pretty much what you expect for a first all grain brew day. The resulting beer was well received, I enjoyed it, and I figured if it was good when i screwed it up, it might be really good if I brewed it well. Continue reading

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Brewing a heady topper clone.

For someone who drinks IPA like I do, it’s a little surprising that I’ve yet to actually brew one. I’ve always felt they are hard to brew well, and I can a good example locally. I’m also intimidated by the idea of brewing one. I like my ipa’s west coast style, or better yet, northern VT style (The Alchemist, Hill Farmstead). I like them dry, lots of hop flavor, citrus aroma, medium bitterness, and balanced. So, when I found this recipe for a heady topper clone in a recent BYO, I had to brew it. Continue reading

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Bitter American Clone Review

Bitter American Clone

This is my first all grain batch, while I find it very had to be objective about my own beer, I’m happy with the results. Despite some of my brew day miscues. It’s not the recipe that it was designed to be do to those changes, but I don’t think it’s worse for it. While I have not tried the beer side by side with 21 A’s bitter american, it’s similar in spirit. Lowish ABV, light body, but not watery, and hoppy. Continue reading

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