These are books I own and reference when I have a question about brewing, a specific style, technique or recipe.

Brewing Books
How to brew – John Palmer
This is the best entry level book on brewing. More technical than Joy of home brewing, but easier to digest than New Brewing Lager Beer.

The Complete Joy of Home brewing – Charlie Papazian

The book to read if you just want to brew some beer, and don’t want to fret about it. It’s a little out dated, but is a laid back read to get you started.

American Sour Beers 
Great book by Michael Tonsemeire on the brewing of american non traditionally fermented beers. Great techniques, and processes shared by some of the best in the US making these alternative fermented beers.
New Brewing Lager Beer: The Most Comprehensive Book for Home and Microbrewers – Gregory J. Noonan
Late brewmaster of Vermont Pub and Brewery, founder of the first brew pub I ever visited. One of the early technical classics on small scale brewing.

Brewing Classic Styles – Jamil Zainasheff, John Palmer

From the stars of Brew Strong, Can You Brew it, and owner of Heretic Brewing. This book contains an amazing collection of extract recipes.IPA: Brewing Techniques, Recipes and the Evolution of India Pale Ale – Mitch Steele
The definitive IPA historical reference, with a large number of ipa recipes from the likes of Stone, the Alchemist, Hill Farmstead, Smuttynose, and many west coasters too.

The Craft of Stone Brewing Co.: Liquid Lore, Epic Recipes, and Unabashed Arrogance – Koch, Greg, Wagner, Steve, Clemens, Randy
History of Stone Brewing, a great recipe reference for Stone Brewing Beers, as well as their history.

The Home Brewer’s Guide to Vintage Beer: Rediscovered Recipes for Classic Brews Dating from 1800 to 1965 – Ronald Pattinson
History and Recipes for vintage mostly English beers. A quick read with interesting period specific recipes for styles that are not like they used to be.

Farmhouse Ales: Culture and Craftsmanship in the Belgian Tradition – Phil Markowski
A history of Saisons and Bier de Garde, the beers of Belgium and northern France. A style growing in popularity in the last few years.

Brewing Better Beer: Master Lesson for Advanced Homeowners – Gordon Strong
An all grain reference to advanced techniques to improved your homebrew by 3 time Ninkasi winner, author, and BJCP Judge Gordon Strong.

For The Love of Hops: The Practical Guide to Aroma, Bitterness and the Culture of Hops – Stan Hieronymus
A book about my favorite ingredient, history, types, how to understand the various components of hops, and how they are used.

Yeast: the Practical Guide to Beer Fermentation – Jamil Zainasheff and Chris White
This is a good resource on yeast, it’s singularly focused, and has some gaps, but is a good reference.

Malt: A Practical Guide from Field to Brewhouse 
Definitive book on the second largest component in your beer. Provides insight in to making, and accessing Malt. A good read from John Mallet and the Brewers Publications.

Water: A Comprehensive Guide for Brewers
I’m not going to lie, second only to yeast this is the most challenging book of the Brewing Elements series to read. Worth it, as Water is the largest component in your beer, and impacts much beyond the flavor.

Seven Barrel Brewery Brewers’ Handbook -Gregory J. Noonan, Scott Russell, Mikel Redman
This is the book that contains all the recipes missing from New Brewing Lager beer, includes extract, partial mash, and all grain recipes from Greg Noonan. Along with a less technical brewing information. This is a hard book to find.

Wild Brews: Culture and Craftsmanship in the Belgian Tradition – Sparrow, Jeff
How to brew wild beers, lambics, belgian styles, and even some american wilds.

Principals of brewing science – George fix
The most scientific book I own on brewing. I have struggled to understand this book at more than a basic level. Now that I have a better concept of the process, I should revisit it.

Brew Like a Pro: Make Pub-Style Draft Beer at Home – Dave Miller
It’s a good reference if you want all grain instructions on brewing Dave’s way. It’s neither as approachable as Joy of or as user friendly. Also not as informative as How to brew, or as technical as New Brewing Lager Beer.

Secrets from the Master Brewers: America’s Top Professional Brewers Share Recipes and Tips for Great Homebrewing – Paul Hertlein, Maura Kate Kilgore, Patrick Higgins 
Tips and recipes from the likes of Fal Allen(Pike Place), Dick Cantwell (Elysian Brewing Company), Greg Noonan (Vermont Pub and Brewery), John Maier (Rogue Brewing Company), and Ray McNeill (McNeills pub and Brewery).

Brewing Made Easy, 2nd Edition: A Step-by-Step Guide to Making Beer at Home – Dennis Fisher, Joe Fisher
A very simplified guide to getting started brewing.

Dave Miller’s Homebrewing Guide: Everything You Need to Know to Make Great-Tasting Beer – Dave Miller
An older brewing text, Dave Millers first brewing book.

Beer Related non brewing books

The Audacity of Hops: The History of America’s Craft Beer Revolution –
Tom Acitelli
Beer Terrain – Jonathan Cook, Suzanne LePageBeer School: Bottling Success at the Brooklyn Brewery – Steve Hindy, Tom PotterBrewing Up a Business: Adventures in Beer from the Founder of Dogfish Head Craft Brewery – Sam Calagione

The Brewmaster’s Table: Discovering the Pleasures of Real Beer with Real Food – Garrett Oliver

Tasting Beer: An Insider’s Guide to the World’s Greatest Drink – Randy Mosher 

The Homebrewer’s Garden: How to Easily Grow, Prepare, and Use Your Own Hops, Malts, Brewing Herbs – Joe Fisher

Hops and Glory: One Man’s Search for the Beer That Built the British Empire – Pete Brown

Beer Is Proof God Loves Us: Reaching for the Soul of Beer and Brewing – Charles W. Bamforth

Beer Lover’s New England – Norman Miller 

Massachusetts Breweries – John Holl, April Darcy 

The Oxford Companion to Beer – Garrett Oliver

Bitter Brew: The Rise and Fall of Anheuser-Busch and America’s Kings of Beer – William Knoedelseder

*** All of these links are referral links to Amazon, I get a small cut of any books purchased when you click through. So far, I’ve never made more than I have invested in software, hosting, or time to write this site.